Monthly Archives: January 2017

First Ever HIPAA Enforcement Action for Delay in Breach Reporting

A delay in timely breach notification may now cost you. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office for Civil Rights (OCR) recently entered a settlement with Presence Health for untimely reporting a breach of unsecured protected health information (PHI). Presence discovered that its operating room schedules containing PHI for 836 individuals were missing on October 22, 2013. Under the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule, breaches like this which involve >500 individuals are required to be reported to the individuals, prominent media outlets and OCR without unreasonable delay and in no case later than 60 days. Presence did not report the breach to OCR until January 31, 2014, approximately 100 days after discovering the breach. OCR’s investigation concluded that Presence failed to notify, without unreasonable delay and within 60 days of discovering the breach, each of the 836 individuals, the media and OCR. Presence agreed to pay $475,000 to settle the potential violations.

The Press Release and Resolution Agreement are available on the OCR website.

Written by: Jacob Simpson

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Final Rule Released to the OIGs Exclusion Authorities

On January 11, 2017, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services released a final rule that incorporates statutory changes, early reinstatement provisions, and policy changes, and clarifies existing regulatory provisions to the OIG’s authorities to exclude persons and entities from participating in Federal health care programs. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 expanded the OIG’s authority to exclude various individuals and entities from participation in Federal health care programs under section 1128 of the Social Security Act (Act). The changes in the final rule to the OIG’s authority were also based on the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA), which amended the OIG’s authority to waive certain exclusions under section 1128 of the Act.

A copy of the final rule is available at: http://go.usa.gov/x9Ugu

Written by: Clay J. Countryman

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